Leading thoughts on ways to revamp secondary schools

By Tope Adaramola

Gone were those days when secondary education in Nigeria was a worthy experience. We had many things that engaged not only our brains but also our brawn. As young people whose greatest assets were their physical strength, the authorities developed the school curriculum to actively engage these potentials.
There was hardly any secondary school, especially the ones owned by government that were not located on an expansive landmass, giving room for effective recreation and all round activities by the students, whether day or border.

There were sporting arenas for different games through which budding talents were horned from healthy competitions. There were also geographical and botanical gardens that provided physical expression to what the students learn in class. Without having visited an airport or boarded an air plane, I already could describe different vegetation in several geographical zones in the world. I realized how great those gardens were when I had the privilege of travelling so many years after school only to physically sight some of the topographies that we were taught in class from the windows of the aero plane.

There were also voluntary societies where the students learned leadership, discipline and patriotism. It was out of sync for any student not to belong to either the Boys Scout, Man “O” War, Red Cross, Boys Brigade or Sheriff. These institutions or societies provided recreation and avenues for the young lass or lads to expend their abundant energies as well as redirect their minds to responsible conduct growing up. I must specially commend the boarding facilities that existed in schools those days.

Among other things they served as the platform for understanding mutual respect and love for those outside your personal confines or narrow territories. This writer was most privileged to attend a cosmopolitan school that had a huge mixture of tribes, from different parts of the country under the then national schools exchange programme. It was a baptism into nationalistic orientation. Being a Yoruba boy, I had to relate with my next bunk guy who perhaps was from Benue, of Idoma extraction, while the guy seating next to me in class hailed from Nnnewi, of Igbo nationality.

The nuances of the different tribes were easily learned and we were orientated into seeing ourselves as Nigerians who must do away with our various parochial beliefs. This affected my world view till today as I could hardly come to terms with anyone preaching noxious tribal or religious sentiments. Ofcourse, why would I forget the rich religious activities that were encouraged in schools. The fear of God was made paramount in the budding hearts of the young lads in school. You either belonged to the FCS (Fellowship of Christian Students) or the MSS (Muslim Students Society).

Aside from the bond of unity and tolerance, the Societies enculturated the students into life of responsibility, civility and decent conduct. No student wanted to stay out of these religious folds as they could easily be tagged “children of the devil” or what we called “Omo Esu” in Yoruba parlance.
To allow all these lessons learned from school to fester in our minds was an environment that was fairly conductive in the home front.

The parents were quite responsible and had adapted to self-contentment, living within their means, rather than indulging in rat-race for wealth as we have nowadays. It was a time when crying home that you were canned by a teacher would most assuredly earn you more punishments, with either of your parents or a guardian taking you back to school and requesting that you are thoroughly flogged before all your classmates. Assembly periods were often dreaded by students, especially the serial offenders.

The School Principal was like a god that must be venerated. They determined when to discipline and what type of discipline to give depending on the gravity of offence committed by the student. You may be asked to uproot a stubborn tree on the school compound or wash all the toilets. The gravest offence could attract expulsion or even dismissal and they were under only little strangle hold from the so called authorities as we have in some cases today. It is not a coincidence that many of those who go through those punishments are today priding themselves as today’s leaders, holding commanding positions in the society.

But years down the line, it is saddening when introspecting on how we missed the tangent so widely. How did we lose all those great values that made our schools great? Where is the discipline? Where are the “culturing pots” that cooked our own generation? Accepted some may say that was in the days of yore, or better put “old school” culture, yet we should ask whether it paid us better or not.

Yes, some felt the environment was harsh, yet we fail to realise that it was that furnace of harshness that the greatness in our generation was fashioned. Many of us, now parents swank about saying we do not want our children to go through what we went through, yet we are where we are today, helplessly seeing our children veering off from the mooring of goodly conduct.

Just as the parents have become more and more irresponsible, obsessively pursuing daily bread at the expense of their “future” so also have the teachers become frustrated partly due to the non-cooperative attitude of parents, fueled by the mollifying of their powers and authority by government authorities who unfortunately are their employers.

The centre seem not to hold anymore. Result of this is what we are seeing today. It calls for urgent attention that terrorist and cultists are being groomed in our secondary schools as we could see unfolding before our eyes, yet we seem unconcerned. Many would have read in the news about how some rampaging students of two secondary schools in Abeokuta battered a superior Police Officer, bathing him with his own blood. News also captured how a student recently ambushed a teacher and shot him dead. Several maleficence that could make one twitch are happening all over the country, courtesy of secondary students on a daily basis.

Without being a pessimist, I beg to say that all these shenanigans are just a tip of the iceberg compared to what we would soon be experiencing. I feel that now is the time for a stakeholders meeting to be convoked by state governments and relevant authorities, in order to revive our secondary schools from the precipice and salvage our collective future. Those stakeholders need not over belabor themselves.

Let them take a look at those traits which I earlier highlighted that made our schools thick and see a way of reinventing them. With that starting point, I think it would be seen that we are serious as a people and government to return sanity to our schools. Surely, this madness has to stop!

Tope Adaramola is a PR practitioner and public commentator

Leadingvthe right thoughts on ways to revamp our secondary schools

By Tope Adaramola

 

Gone were those days when secondary education in Nigeria was a worthy experience. We had many things that engaged not only our brains but also our brawn. As young people whose greatest assets were their physical strength, the authorities developed the school curriculum to actively engage these potentials.
There was hardly any secondary school, especially the ones owned by government that were not located on an expansive landmass, giving room for effective recreation and all round activities by the students, whether day or border. There were sporting arenas for different games through which budding talents were horned from healthy competitions.

Therewere also geographical and botanical gardens that provided physical expression to what the students learn in class. Without having visited an airport or boarded an air plane, I already could describe different vegetation in several geographical zones in the world. I realized how great those gardens were when I had the privilege of travelling so many years after school only to physically sight some of the topographies that we were taught in class from the windows of the aero plane.

There were also voluntary societies where the students learned leadership, discipline and patriotism. It was out of sync for any student not to belong to either the Boys Scout, Man “O” War, Red Cross, Boys Brigade or Sheriff. These institutions or societies provided recreation and avenues for the young lass or lads to expend their abundant energies as well as redirect their minds to responsible conduct growing up. I must specially commend the boarding facilities that existed in schools those days.

Among other things they served as the platform for understanding mutual respect and love for those outside your personal confines or narrow territories. This writer was most privileged to attend a cosmopolitan school that had a huge mixture of tribes, from different parts of the country under the then national schools exchange programme. It was a baptism into nationalistic orientation. Being a Yoruba boy, I had to relate with my next bunk guy who perhaps was from Benue, of Idoma extraction, while the guy seating next to me in class hailed from Nnnewi, of Igbo nationality. The nuances of the different tribes were easily learned and we were orientated into seeing ourselves as Nigerians who must do away with our various parochial beliefs.

This affected my world view till today as I could hardly come to terms with anyone preaching noxious tribal or religious sentiments. Ofcourse, why would I forget the rich religious activities that were encouraged in schools. The fear of God was made paramount in the budding hearts of the young lads in school. You either belonged to the FCS (Fellowship of Christian Students) or the MSS (Muslim Students Society). Aside from the bond of unity and tolerance, the Societies enculturated the students into life of responsibility, civility and decent conduct.

No student wanted to stay out of these religious folds as they could easily be tagged “children of the devil” or what we called “Omo Esu” in Yoruba parlance.
To allow all these lessons learned from school to fester in our minds was an environment that was fairly conductive in the home front. The parents were quite responsible and had adapted to self-contentment, living within their means, rather than indulging in rat-race for wealth as we have nowadays.

It was a time when crying home that you were canned by a teacher would most assuredly earn you more punishments, with either of your parents or a guardian taking you back to school and requesting that you are thoroughly flogged before all your classmates. Assembly periods were often dreaded by students, especially the serial offenders. The School Principal was like a god that must be venerated. They determined when to discipline and what type of discipline to give depending on the gravity of offence committed by the student. You may be asked to uproot a stubborn tree on the school compound or wash all the toilets

. The gravest offence could attract expulsion or even dismissal and they were under only little strangle hold from the so called authorities as we have in some cases today. It is not a coincidence that many of those who go through those punishments are today priding themselves as today’s leaders, holding commanding positions in the society.
But years down the line, it is saddening when introspecting on how we missed the tangent so widely. How did we lose all those great values that made our schools great? Where is the discipline?

Whereare the “culturing pots” that cooked our own generation? Accepted some may say that was in the days of yore, or better put “old school” culture, yet we should ask whether it paid us better or not. Yes, some felt the environment was harsh, yet we fail to realise that it was that furnace of harshness that the greatness in our generation was fashioned. Many of us, now parents swank about saying we do not want our children to go through what we went through, yet we are where we are today, helplessly seeing our children veering off from the mooring of goodly conduct.

Just as the parents have become more and more irresponsible, obsessively pursuing daily bread at the expense of their “future” so also have the teachers become frustrated partly due to the non-cooperative attitude of parents, fueled by the mollifying of their powers and authority by government authorities who unfortunately are their employers. The centre seem not to hold anymore. Result of this is what we are seeing today. It calls for urgent attention that terrorist and cultists are being groomed in our secondary schools as we could see unfolding before our eyes, yet we seem unconcerned.

Many would have read in the news about how some rampaging students of two secondary schools in Abeokuta battered a superior Police Officer, bathing him with his own blood. News also captured how a student recently ambushed a teacher and shot him dead. Several maleficence that could make one twitch are happening all over the country, courtesy of secondary students on a daily basis.

Without being a pessimist, I beg to say that all these shenanigans are just a tip of the iceberg compared to what we would soon be experiencing. I feel that now is the time for a stakeholders meeting to be convoked by state governments and relevant authorities, in order to revive our secondary schools from the precipice and salvage our collective future.

Those stakeholders need not over belabor themselves. Let them take a look at those traits which I earlier highlighted that made our schools thick and see a way of reinventing them. With that starting point, I think it would be seen that we are serious as a people and government to return sanity to our schools. Surely, this madness has to stop!

Tope Adaramola
is a PR practitioner and public commentator

JAMB uncovers 706,189 illegal admissions by varsities, others

By admin

The Registrar, Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB), Prof. Is-haq Oloyede stated that agency has uncovered 706,189 illegal admissions by universities, Colleges of Education, polytechnics and other allies.

Oloyede at the Consultative Sensitization Meeting with Select Stakeholders in Abuja today,  said the illegal admissions have damaged the image of the country.

He said the illegality was perpetrated in all the six geopolitical zones by public and private higher institutions.
While about 114 universities accounted for 67.795 of the illegal admissions, 137 polytechnics were responsible for 489,918, 80 Colleges of Education for 142, 818 and 37 other institutions involved in 5,678 cases.

The undisclosed admissions were perpetrated from 2017 to 2020 by the affected institutions.
He said such admissions were unknown to JAMB as prescribed by law.

While about 114 universities accounted for 67.795 of the illegal admissions, 137 polytechnics were responsible for 489,918, 80 Colleges of Education for 142, 818 and 37 other institutions involved in 5,678 cases.

The undisclosed admissions were perpetrated from 2017 to 2020 by the affected institutions.

He said such admissions were unknown to JAMB as prescribed by law.

But the Minister of Education has assented to JAMB’s plea for a last chance for the violators.

He said the institutions disregarded JAMB’s Central Admissions Processing System (CAPS which allows institutions to “only admit candidates that met the requirements.”

He said the affected institutions’ Vice Chancellors, Rectors and Provosts have admitted their mistakes by “sending a formal letter of confession and disclosure to the JAMB Registrar.”

In the list of the 114 universities given to stakeholders, some of the top indicted for illegal admissions include University of Jos(7,600); Benue State University(6,171); Olabisi Onabanjo University(5,669); Kwara State University(4, 281); Novena University(3,432); University of Nigeria, Nsukka(2,732); and Imo State University(2,330).

Others listed were University of Nigeria, Nsukka(2,732); Imo State University(2,330); University of Calabar(2,074); NTA Television College(1,934); Baze University(1,717); Oduduwa University(1,450); Kaduna State College of Education(1,417); Tai Solarin University of Education(1,101); Al-qalam University(1,062); Gombe State University(1,017).

Oloyede said: “As a measure of mopping up the backlog of improperly admitted candidates, the Honourable Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu, assented to the Board’s plea for a last chance for the violators.

Nigeria’s Faith Odunsi, 15, crowned world’s Best Mathematics student; solves 19 questions in 60 seconds

By Favour Nnabugwu

The National Mathematics Centre of Nigeria (NMC) has crowned Miss Faith Odunsi of Ambassador College, Otta in Ogun State, Nigeria, as the ‘MATHEMATICS QUEEN’ for her outstanding performance in the National Olympiads Competition. Miss Faith Odunsi reportedly solved 19 mathematics questions in 60 seconds and thus became the Best Girl in Mathematics competition

Nigerian student, Faith Odunsi, 15, beat China, the UK, the US, and others in a global math competition — a move that made herself a part of history.

As the winner of the Global Open Mathematics competition, Odunsi excelled in all rounds of the competition and didn’t immediately think she would be announced the winner until she answered more questions than her competitors in the final round.

“My heart raced but I felt relieved,” said the West Africa queen

Currently, Odunsi is in her final year as a high school student at the Ambassadors School, Ota Ogun State.

Odunsi’s father is a doctor and her mother is a businesswoman and she says she has her dad to thank for the math genes

This accomplishment is something that Odunsi says makes her feel “happy and honored.” Despite the fact that the competition was tough, Odunsi managed to win by a 30-point margin.

Now, as the winner of the competition, Odunsi not only walked away with the title, but she also secured a $1,000 prize.

WAEC to hold May/June, increase fee from N13,950 to N18, 000

By Favour Nnabugwu

 

The Head of Nigeria National office, West African Examination Council, WAEC, Mr. Patrick Areghan has announced that the 2022 West African Senior School Certificate Examination, WASSCE, will be conducted in May/June.

Recall that in recent times, WAEC conducted WASSCE between August and October.
Mr. Areghan disclosed the revert back to the previous duration of the conduct of WASSCE, on Monday while announcing 2021 results at the council national office, Yaba.

He said, ” Let me thank the Federal and the various Ministries of Education for working so hard to stabilize the academic calendar. Accordingly, as a result of the return to normalcy, the Honourable Minister of Education has requested that the WASSCE for School Candidates, 2022 should be conducted in May/June 2022.

This position has been communicated to the Registrar to Council in Accra and he has assured us that it will be reckoned with in drawing up the International Time-table for the examination. And so, by the special grace of God, the WASSCE for School Candidates, 2022 will be taking place in May/June 2022. Entries for the examination will be floated on Monday, December 6, 2021.” WAEC boss explained.

Meanwhile, Mr. Areghan has disclosed that from 2022, the cost of registration for the West African Senior School Certificate Examination, WASSCE, has been raised from N13,950 to N18,000 to meet the demands of economic reality.

According to him:” Owing to the devastating effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic which has brought the global economy to its knees, the unabating spiraling inflation in the country as can be seen in the general cost of doing business and the multiplier effect of the unabating insecurity in the country, which have consequential effects on the cost of our operations, it is no longer possible to continue to provide services with the current fee of N13,950.00 per candidate.

Furthermore, our ad-hoc workers – Supervisors, Examiners, Checkers, item Writers and indeed, all examination functionaries, have been agitating for improved remunerations.
We have received approval from the appropriate quarters with effect from the WASSCE for School Candidates, 2022, to charge N18,000.00 per candidate. We are, therefore, asking all school principals to collect N18,000.00 per candidate for registration.

A part of this new fee has been dedicated to the enhancement of the remunerations for the various examination functionaries and our Governing Board has graciously approved the remunerations, which will come into effect from the WASSCE for School Candidates, 2022.

Any amount beyond this ceiling will not be to our consent or knowledge and will definitely not come to the purse of the West African Examinations Council.” Mr. Areghan noted.

WAEC releases WASSCE results, 80.56% processed, 19.44% being processed

By Favour Nnabugwu the

 

 

The release of the results of the West African Senior School Certificate Examination ,WASSCE for School Candidates, 2021 in Nigeria have been released with a total of 80.56 percent fully processed, and 19.44 percent still being processed due to some issues being resolved.

The Head of Nigeria National office of the Council, Mr. Patrick Areghan disclosed this on Monday, announcing that a total of total of One Million, Five Hundred and Seventy Three Thousand, Eight Hundred and Forty Nine (1,573,849) candidates registered for the examination from Nineteen Thousand, Four Hundred and Twenty Five (19,425) recognised secondary schools in the country. Of the number that registered for the examination, One Million, Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand, Two Hundred and Sixty One (1,560,261) candidates sat the examination.

Stating that the body needed to be praised for the timely release of results after 45 days of completion of the examination that ran between August 16 and October 8, 2021 despite the myriad of challenges it faced in some parts of the country, coupled with effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

His words: “The examination, which was an international one, took place simultaneously throughout the five member countries of the Council – The Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, using the same International Timetable.

“The examination spanned seven weeks, between August 16 and October 8, 2021. Throughout the period, we were faced with serious security challenges in the South East (IPOB and ESN sit-at-home order) and banditry, kidnapping, insurgency, etc, in the north and other parts of the country. All these, coupled with the continuous effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic, made the whole exercise an Herculean one.

“In conducting the examination, we were guided by the various measures/
protocols rolled out by the Federal and various State governments, aimed at checking the spread of the Corona Virus Disease. The Coordination of Examiners and Marking of Candidates’ Scripts took place at Eighty Five (85) traditional and three (3) e-Marking Venues throughout the country. A total of Seventy Seven Thousand, Three Hundred and Sixty-Eight (77,368) Examiners participated in the coordination and marking exercise.

“The examination ended on October 8, 2021 and today, Monday, November 22, 2021 – 45 days after the conduct of the last paper, we are releasing the result! This is a record time, taking into consideration the fact that we lost a week to insecurity, during the marking exercise in the South East, occasioned by the heightened tension before and during the Anambra Gubernatorial election.
“It is, therefore, not true, as you can see, that WAEC delayed the release of the results of the WASSCE (SC) 2021 as is being speculated in some quarters. We have kept to our promise, in spite of all odds. We should be praised rather than being vilified. Nothing can be faster or earlier than what we have done. We do not release results without marking the scripts and processing the scores. We are grateful to the examiners for doing a good job within the stipulated period.

“A total of One Million, Five Hundred and Seventy Three Thousand, Eight Hundred and Forty Nine (1,573,849) candidates registered for the examination from Nineteen Thousand, Four Hundred and Twenty Five (19,425) recognised secondary schools in the country. Of the number that registered for the examination, One Million, Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand, Two Hundred and Sixty One (1,560,261) candidates sat the examination.

“The examination was also administered to candidates from some schools in Benin Republic and Cote d’Ivoire, where the Nigeria curriculum for Senior Secondary School is being used. Schools in Equatorial Guinea could not present candidates for the examination due to logistic challenges posed by COVID-19. ” He said.

Breakdown of the results

Mr. Areghan explained that:” I also wish to report that a total of One Thousand, Five Hundred and Thirty Nine (1,539) candidates, with varying degrees of Special Needs, registered for the examination. Out of this number, Four Hundred and Sixty (460) were visually challenged, Five Hundred and Eighty Two (582) had impaired hearing; Three Hundred and Sixty Two (362) were spastic cum mentally challenged and Fifty Nine (59) were physically challenged. All these candidates were adequately provided for in the administration of the examination. The results of these candidates have been processed and are also being released along with those of other candidates.

“Of the total number of One Million, Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand, Two Hundred and Sixty One (1,560,261) candidates that sat the examination, Seven Hundred and Eighty Four Thousand, Six Hundred and Seventy Seven (784,677) were males while Seven Hundred and Seventy Five Thousand, Five Hundred and Eighty Four (775,584) were females, representing 50.29% and 49.71%, respectively.

“Out of the total number of candidates that sat the examination in Nigeria, One Million, Two Hundred and Fifty Six Thousand, Nine Hundred and Ninety (1,256,990) candidates, representing 80.56% have their results fully processed and released while Three Hundred and Three Thousand, Two Hundred and Seventy One (303,271) candidates, representing 19.44% have a few of their subjects still being processed due to some issues being resolved. Efforts are, however, being made to speedily complete the processing to enable all the affected candidates get their results fully processed and released within the next one week.

Analysis of results
Candidates have good standing despite hitches during the examination
Responding to questions on the performance of students at this year’s WASSCE, the Head of WAEC reiterated that collective efforts of all stakeholders were responsible for the 89.62 percent obtained credit and above in a minimum of any five (5) subjects (i.e with or without English Language and/ or Mathematics.

He gave the breakdown as follows: “The analysis of the statistics of the performance of candidates in the examination shows that out of the One Million, Five Hundred and Sixty Thousand, Two Hundred and Sixty One (1,560,261) candidates that sat the examination,

“One Million, Three Hundred and Ninety Eight Thousand, Three Hundred and Seventy (1,398,370) candidates, representing 89.62%, obtained credit and above in a minimum of any five (5) subjects (i.e with or without English Language and/ or Mathematics;

“One Million, Two Hundred and Seventy Four Thousand, Seven Hundred and Eighty Four (1,274,784) candidates, representing 81.7%, obtained credits and above in a minimum of five (5) subjects, including English Language and Mathematics.”

Ratio between male and female

“Of this number, Six Hundred and Thirty Thousand, One Hundred and Thirty Eight (630,138) i.e. 49.43% were male candidates, while Six Hundred and Forty Four Thousand, Six Hundred and Forty Six (644,646) i.e. 50.57% were female candidates. The percentage of candidates in this category in the WASSCE for School Candidates, 2020, that is, those who obtained credit and above in a minimum of five (5) subjects, including English Language and Mathematics, was 65.24%. Thus, there is an appreciable 16.46% improvement in performance in this regard.

“The results of One Hundred and Seventy Thousand, One Hundred and Forty Six (170,146) candidates, representing 10.9% of the total number of candidates that sat the examination, are being withheld in connection with various reported cases of examination malpractice

UNILORIN expels 400-level student for assaulting female lecturer, faces prosecution

By Favour Nnabugwu

 

The management of the University of Ilorin has expelled a student of the Department of Microbiology, Waliu Salaudeen, who was found guilty of assaulting a female lecturer in the same department.

A statement by the varsity’s Director of Corporate Affairs, Mr Kunle Akogun, stated that the verdict was handed down by the Student Disciplinary Committee after Salaudeen was arraigned on Monday.

According to him, the student has 48 days to appeal the verdict.

“Salaudeen has since been handed over to the police for further necessary action,” Akogun added.

A letter to Salaudeen by the varsity Registrar, Mrs Fola Olowoleni, obtained by our correspondent, read, “You will recall that you appeared before the Student Disciplinary Committee to defend yourself in respect of an allegation of misconduct levelled against you.

“After due consideration of all the evidence before it, the committee was convinced beyond any reasonable doubt that the allegation of misconduct has been established against you. It has accordingly recommended to the vice-chancellor, who in the exercise of the power conferred on him directed that you, Salaudeen Waliu Aanuoluwa, be expelled from the university.

“Accordingly, you are hereby expelled from the university with immediate effect.

“You are required to submit forthwith all university property in your custody, including your student identity card to the dean of student affairs or his representative and keep off the campus.”

Recall that Salaudeen, alias Captain Walz, a final-year student, who battered a female lecturer, Mrs Rahmat Zakariyau, had explained the reason for his action.

A campus journal, University Campus Journalist, had reported that  Salaudeen claimed that he went to the office of the female lecturer to beg her to waive the mandatory Students Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES) course, which he missed due to unforeseen circumstances.

He claimed to have met Mrs Zakariyau numerous times over the matter, adding he only got negative responses before the last Thursday assault on the lecturer.

The suspect, while speaking to the journal, said he was arrested and locked up for two months, which prevented him from attending to his SIWES duties.

FG increases to N8.5bn TETFund grants to varsities, others

By Favour Nnabugwu

 

The Federal Government has increased Tertiary Education Trust Fund (TETFund) research grants to universities and other tertiary institutions to N8.5 billion, up from the N7.5 billion in 2020.

The Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu, who announced the increment while declaring open the first National Conference on Research, Training and Development in Zaria, noted that in 2019, the grants totaled N5 billion.

The conference, under the theme: “Research, Training and Development in Nigeria’s educational system in the 21st century: challenges and way forward” was organized by the Institute of Education, Ahmadu Bello University, (ABU) Zaria.

The minister, represented by the Executive Secretary, Tertiary Education Trust Fund (TETFund), Prof. Suleiman Bogoro, commended President Muhammadu Buhari for doing a lot in the area of education.

He added that the Federal Government had decided to raise its budgetary allocation to the education sector by 50 percent in next year’s budget, with a view to addressing the funding shortfall for the sector.

The minister stressed the global importance of research in any academic community, saying that the number of academic publications was not enough, as what mattered most was the amount of research grants one attracted to his or her university as a professor or senior academic officer.

The minister congratulated ABU for winning a total of 12 research grants in 2020 from the TETFund as against the five it won in 2019.

“I am really happy that things are gradually changing in ABU. As one of the first generation universities in Nigeria, ABU should not take the rear seat in the area of research and other academic activities,” he said.

The minister recalled with nostalgia some of vibrant intellectual activities organised by students that attracted many to ABU, citing the examples of the popular Moot Court at the Faculty of Law and the Mock Summit at the Department of Political Science and International Studies.

The minister, however, noted with dismay, that those epoch-making events by students had ceased to exist in recent years, although they were beginning to pick up under the leadership of Prof. Kabiru Bala as the institution’s Vice-Chancellor.

Earlier, Prof. Bala, had stressed the importance of research in national development, saying that this was what promoted the Institute of Education to organise the annual national conference on research, training and development.

Violence in schools loses $11 trn lifetime earnings

By admin

Violence in and around schools severely impacts educational outcomes, and society pays a heavy price as a result, with an estimated $11 trillion in lost lifetime earnings, according to a new report by the World Bank

Preventing violence in and through school is therefore a prerequisite for girls and boys getting the education they need and deserve, and acquiring the skills, knowledge and values that provide the foundations for strong and inclusive societies.

While there is no doubt that education is transformative, simply going to school is not enough. Real learning, the process of receiving and distilling information, of thinking and creating and producing and socializing, is less likely to happen if a child is scared or traumatized.

This report demonstrates that violence in and around schools negatively impacts educational outcomes, and society pays a heavy price as a result (with an estimate of $11 trillion in lost lifetime earnings)..

Ending violence in and around school (VIAS) is essential to reap the benefits from education and ensure children’s well-being. Receiving an education of good quality is the right of every child, as enshrined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Education plays a unique role in promoting respect for human rights, and contributing to safe and inclusive societies that do not condone the use of violence, but rather provide children with the skills they will need as adults to find peaceful solutions to conflicts.

VIAS is a threat to both schooling and learning, as well as to children’s well-being, health, and future earnings as adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined violence as “the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against a person or group that results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation.” Violence is the result of an abusive use of force.

The harm can be actual or threatened. It can lead to injury or death, but also to trauma or other mental health symptoms. Violence is often multidimensional, as individuals are often subjected to multiple forms of violence and in multiple locations.

VIAS includes but is not limited to child victimization, physical and psychological exploitation, cyber victimization, bullying, fights, and sexual violence. It also includes violence by teachers such as corporal punishment, with potential negative impacts.

Overall, VIAS has major effects on children’s well-being and health, and through reduced attainment and achievement, it reduces earnings and productivity in adulthood.

NUC receives Concept Note for Aviation & Aerospace University from Minister of Aviation

CAPTION:

R- Aviation Minister, Senator Hadi Sirika presents the Concept Note for the establishment of the African Aviation and Aerospace University Abuja to the Executive Secretary National Universities Commission (NUC), Prof Rasheed in Abuja today

 

 

By Favour Nnabugwu

 

 

National Universities Commission (NUC) has received note for establishment of Aviation & Aerospace University to expedite action on it.

Executive Secretary, National University Commission, NUC, Professor Abubakar Adamu Rasheed who received the note from the Minister of Aviation, Send Hadi Sirika,  said the commission will engage some professors to perfect the concept note for immediate approval.

“I can assure you that by the end of the month (July), we are going to have a brand new University, the first of its kind in Abuja, first African University dedicated to aviation and aerospace study in the country”.

According to the Executive Secretary, “The value of such university can’t be quantified and commended the Minister for his boldness and courage”.

“This aviation under your guidance will be the first to show the way that we can support the establishment of specialized university that won’t only serve us but serve the African region and the International community”. He stated.

Presenting the Concept,  Aviation Minister, Senator Hadi Sirika said that the ‘African Aviation and Aerospace University Abuja’ will be dedicated to research and development of knowledge in Aviation and Aerospace.

Sirika added that the decision to establish the specialised university was informed by the need to fill some identified gaps in the growth and development of the aviation sector.

“When we took the leadership in civil aviation, we identified and understood the gap in the growth and development of civil aviation in Nigeria in particular and Africa in general”.

The Minister said, “We  are deficient in research and development in civil aviation and aerospace technology and that has caused a lot of underdevelopment of the sector and made us to be backward”

Sirika further said that the huge gaps and deficiencies have left the Civil Aviation sector to be managed with basic knowledge of either being a pilot or aircraft maintenance engineer, with no one going into research and development to understand the Civil Aviation and Aerospace industry to grow it for our own betterment and leverage on the sector to recreate the economy, improve the well being, add to the GDP and most importantly to expend knowledge horizon of Nigerians.

“We have been working three to four years now into this and we developed a concept note based on the advice by Executive Secretary NUC for critique and that will fast track the process of setting up the University. We come up with concept note of what will be the focus of this University” he explained.

He added that “the potential of this University to serve the market of civil aviation and aerospace within the continent cannot be overemphasized. Once the University takes off, a lot will happen and it will change the dynamic”.

Sirika expressed gratitude to the Executive Secretary and his team for guiding the process leading to the submission of the concept note and the assurance that it will be expeditiously concluded.